The Smiths: Complete (Bio & Vid)


When Steven Patrick Morrissey was 13, he was watching The Old Grey Whistle Test, a BBC rock television show, when the New York Dolls came on. Later, he called it “my first real emotional experience.” It was hardly his last: Growing up awkward, tall and shy in suburban Manchester, he was the archetypal kid who didn’t fit in, writing poetry and letters to members of the British rock press, disagreeing articulately with their critics.

Years before, Manchester had lost out to Liverpool as Britain’s provincial rock capital, but with the arrival of punk, it snatched the crown back. Morrissey joined a punk band called the Nosebleeds briefly, but he had other ideas. In May 1982, he read that a writer for Record Mirror named Johnny Marr, a guitarist who had been in a couple of bands, was looking for a lyricist. The two met and hit it off immediately, and a year later, they’d put together a band, had a couple of gigs, signed to London’s Rough Trade Records and started releasing singles. It took a couple tries, but they eventually had a hit of sorts called “What Difference Does It Make?

Read more @NPR.ORG: http://tinyurl.com/6wefvyh

Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

The Smiths were the definitive British indie rock band of the ’80s, marking the end of synth-driven new wave and the beginning of the guitar rock that dominated English rock into the ’90s. Sonically, the group was indebted to the British Invasion, crafting ringing, melodic three-minute pop singles, even for their album tracks. But their scope was far broader than that of a revivalist band. The group’s core members, vocalist Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr, were obsessive rock fans inspired by the D.I.Y. ethics of punk, but they also had a fondness for girl groups, pop, and rockabilly. Morrissey and Marr also represented one of the strangest teams of collaborators in rock history. Marr was the rock traditionalist, looking like an elegant version of Keith Richards during the Smiths’ heyday and meticulously layering his guitar tracks in the studio. Morrissey, on the other hand, broke from rock tradition by singing in a keening, self-absorbed croon, embracing the forlorn, romantic poetry of Oscar Wilde, publicly declaring his celibacy, performing with a pocketful of gladioli and a hearing aid, and making no secret of his disgust for most of his peers. While it eventually led to the Smiths’ early demise, the friction between Morrissey and Marr resulted in a flurry of singles and albums over the course of three years that provided the blueprint for British guitar rock in the following decade.

Read more from Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/7znfz7s

~ by castleqwayr on January 26, 2012.

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